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Madhav Kidao is an Architectural designer currently based in London.

He is an Architecture graduate from the University of Nottingham and The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL having graduated from the MSc Adaptive Architecture and Computation with Distinction and the MArch Architecture (RIBA Part 2) with Distinction.

Madhav has worked for a diverse range of architecture and design practices in the UK, The Netherlands and Japan. His research and design interests are primarily focused towards the evolving and symbiotic relationship between society, technology and the environment, in particular exploring the architectural and sociological impacts from the overlap of artificial systems and natural systems and their impact on construction methodologies. The use of photography, film, simulation and installation are used as means of exploring and representing these concepts.

e: madhav@madhavkidao.com
t: +44(0)7746 538397
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Achitizer A+ Awards Finalist - Pop Up




Core 77 2013 Design Awards - Professional Notable Honoree






The BVLGARI b.lounge and Pavilion for Abu Dhabi Art 2012 in collaboration with NaNA (Not a Number Architects)













The Theatre of Synthetic Realities is a series of real and fictitious locations and events, actors and devices that attempt to question our production, embodiment and perception of social space as mediated through technology. Through the use of ubiquitous personal and mobile computing we have become both constant consumers and producers of information, both live receiver and transmitter. We, and our environments, exist simultaneously as physical and real-time digital manifestations, as such augmenting our relationship to space, time and experience.

Ultimately, however, the project aims to not only question our understanding of space and time but to also interrogate the ethical nature of the methodologies in which we do so. The project envisions a world in which the design process is predicated by the development of bespoke, open source and collaborative technology; technology that acts as a physical and cognitive extension of ourselves; a symbiotic prosthesis that facilitates new forms of behaviour and thought. In the cyclical translation between the physical and the digital, our perceptions of the world are reinterpreted, redefined and reconstructed. Reality is filtered and manipulated in real-time to suit the individual's desires and it is within this domain that the project operates.

The Theatre, as illustrated in the film Making Friends and Other Functions, is a vehicle in which to explore the relationship that exists between the designer/creator and his or her repertoire of increasingly intelligent collaborative tools, be these tools to create or tools to think. The machines, under the selective guidance of the designer, construct their own reality based upon the information they extract from their environment and its unwilling occupants. This is ultimately a task with no beginning or end, and fundamentally questionable ethical integrity. As result we are left to question the role of the Architect, both in regard to creative authorship and ethical responsibility.

Only by probing the boundaries of what is considered moral behaviour in regard to current cultural conventions can we make an educated prediction upon the impact of complex, emergent and evolving design propositions.
Whilst change affords thrilling new creative potential it also constantly questions the ethical beliefs of our culture and as such suggests the designer asks his or herself not whether one can use technology in a certain manner but whether they ought to.

We Make Money Not Art interview


Making Friends and Other Functions is a illustration of a possible iteration of the Theatre of Synthetic Realities. Working collaboratively and symbiotically with a network of semi-autonomous machine actors, the designer/editor attempts to recreate a film for a live global audience, through the use of unwilling actors. The machines construct their own reality based upon the information they extract from their environment alongside the selective guidance of the observer. This is ultimately a task with no beginning or end, and fundamentally questionable ethical integrity.